Hernia & Abdominal Wall Surgery


INGUINAL HERNIA
An inguinal hernia occurs when soft tissue — usually part of the membrane lining the abdominal cavity (omentum) or part of the intestine — protrudes through a weak point in the abdominal muscles. The resulting bulge can be painful, especially when you cough, bend over or lift a heavy object.
An inguinal hernia isn’t necessarily dangerous by itself. It doesn’t get better or go away on its own, however, and it can lead to life-threatening complications. For this reason, your doctor is likely to recommend surgery to fix an inguinal hernia that’s painful or becoming larger. Inguinal hernia repair is a common surgical procedure

UMBILICAL HERNIA
An umbilical hernia occurs when part of the intestine protrudes through an opening in the abdominal muscles. Umbilical hernia is a common and typically harmless condition. Umbilical hernias are most common in infants, but they can affect adults as well. In an infant, an umbilical hernia may be especially evident when the infant cries, causing the baby’s bellybutton to protrude. This is a classic sign of an umbilical hernia.
Many umbilical hernias close on their own by age 1, though some take longer to heal. To prevent complications, umbilical hernias that don’t disappear by age 3 or those that appear during adulthood may need surgical repair


umbilical hernia Menorca Surgery
HERNIOPLASTY
For open hernia repair surgery, a single long incision is made in the groin. The weak spot in the muscle wall—where the hernia bulges through—traditionally has been repaired by sewing the edges of healthy muscle tissue together (herniorrhaphy). This is appropriate for smaller hernias that have been present since birth (indirect hernias) and for healthy tissues, where it is possible to use stitches without adding stress on the tissue.
Mesh patches of synthetic material are now being widely used to repair hernias (hernioplasty). This is especially true for large hernias and for hernias that reoccur. Patches are sewn over the weakened area in the abdominal (belly) wall after the hernia is pushed back into place. The patch decreases the tension on the weakened belly wall, reducing the risk that a hernia will recur.

WHAT TO EXPECT AFTER SURGERY
Most people who have open hernia repair surgery are able to go home the same day. Recovery time is about 3 weeks.They are even able of driving the same day in most cases. Normal physical activity can be restarted in three or four weeks